Dirty Air Alert Monday

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It will take action by each of us Monday to lower the risk to our children

Loveland, Ohio – The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency has issued an Air Quality Advisory on Monday for Loveland. and the surrounding counties of Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren in Ohio, and Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties in Kentucky. 

The Agency expects to see levels of ozone in the “unhealthy for sensitive groups” range on the Air Quality Index (AQI).
Health Message: Active children and adults, and people with lung disease, such as asthma, should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.

 

Use this Real-Time Air Quality link to see the current air quality and a map of the area that “loops” throughout the day showing smog moving into and out of the Loveland area.
 

On Air Quality Advisory days, everyone can help reduce ozone formation by taking the following actions:

  • Bike, or walk instead of drive.
  • Refuel your vehicle after 8 p.m.; do not top off when refueling and tighten the gas cap.
  • DON’T RIDE YOUR MOTORCYCLE
  • Do not idle your vehicle; exhaust contributes considerably to ozone formation.
  • Combine trips or eliminating unnecessary vehicle trips.

  • Avoid use of gasoline-powered lawn equipment on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Avoid use of oil-based paints and stains on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Never burn leaves or other yard trimmings.
  • Suspend use of fire pits, campfires and grills on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Conserve electricity by turning out lights and unplugging unused appliances and electronics.


Children face special risks from air pollution because their lungs are growing and because they are so active Air-pollution-health-dangers

Just like the arms and legs, the largest portion of a child’s lungs will grow long after he or she is born. Eighty percent of their tiny air sacs develop after birth. Those sacs, called the alveoli, are where the life-sustaining transfer of oxygen to the blood takes place. The lungs and their alveoli aren’t fully grown until children become adults.1 In addition, the body’s defenses that help adults fight off infections are still developing in young bodies.2 Children have more respiratory infections than adults, which also seems to increase their susceptibility to air pollution.

Furthermore, children don’t behave like adults, and their behavior also affects their vulnerability. They are outside for longer periods and are usually more active when outdoors. Consequently, they inhale more polluted outdoor air than adults typically do.

Air Pollution Increases Risk of Underdeveloped Lungs

A Southern California Children’s Health study looked at the long-term effects of particle pollution on teenagers. Tracking 1,759 children who were between ages 10 and 18 from 1993 to 2001, researchers found that those who grew up in more polluted areas face the increased risk of having underdeveloped lungs, which may never recover to their full capacity. The average drop in lung function was 20 percent below what was expected for the child’s age, similar to the impact of growing up in a home with parents who smoked.

Community health studies are pointing to less obvious, but serious effects from year-round exposure to ozone, especially for children. Scientists followed 500 Yale University students and determined that living just four years in a region with high levels of ozone and related co-pollutants was associated with diminished lung function and frequent reports of respiratory symptoms. 6 A much larger study of 3,300 school children in Southern California found reduced lung function in girls with asthma and boys who spent more time outdoors in areas with high levels of ozone.

Read more from the American Lung Association

For 17 years, the American Lung Association has analyzed data from official air quality monitors to compile the State of the Air report. The more you learn about the air you breathe, the more you can protect your health and take steps to make our air cleaner and healthier.

In American Lung Association’s, Report Card: Ohio, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren counties all receive an “F”
Cincinnati Air Quality a Mixed Bag, Finds 2016 ‘State of the Air’ Report

 

Step up to Curb Pollution in Our Community.

  • Drive less. Combine trips, walk, bike, carpool or vanpool, and use buses, subways or other alternatives to driving. Vehicle emissions are a major source of air pollution. Support community plans that provide ways to get around that don’t require a car, such as more sidewalks, bike trails and transit systems.
  • Use less electricity.Turn out the lights and use energy-efficient appliances. Generating electricity is one of the biggest sources of pollution, particularly in the eastern United States.
  • Don’t burn wood or trash. Burning firewood and trash is among the largest sources of particle pollution in many parts of the country. If you must use a fireplace or stove for heat, convert your woodstove to natural gas, which has far fewer polluting emissions. Compost and recycle as much as possible and dispose of other waste properly; don’t burn it. Support efforts in your community to ban outdoor burning of construction and yard wastes. Avoid the use of outdoor hydronic heaters, also called outdoor wood boilers, which are frequently much more polluting than woodstoves.
  • Make sure your local school system requires clean school buses, which includes replacing or retrofitting old school buses with filters and other equipment to reduce emissions. Make sure your local schools don’t idle their buses, a step that can immediately reduce emissions.

 



Now Enrolling at All About Kids at Wards Corner today!


 

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