lovelandmagazine

2106 POSTS 49 COMMENTS

This “Law You Can Use” consumer legal information column was provided by the Ohio State Bar Association.  It was prepared by Philip C. Richter, Executive Director of the Ohio Elections Commission.

Q:  What is a recall election?
A: Recall is a method that can be used to remove an official from a public office before the end of his or her term.  A recall election is a right reserved to the people served by the official. It can only take place after a petition signed by the required number of qualified voters is certified.

Q:  Could an Ohio governor be removed through a recall election?
A: No. Neither the Ohio constitution nor the Ohio Revised Code (ORC), Ohio’s collection of written laws, provide for recall elections for statewide offices. For this reason, Ohio voters cannot use recall to remove a governor.

Q:  Can a city official be recalled in Ohio?
A: Yes. The ORC provides that any elective officer of a municipality may be removed from office by qualified voters as long as that official has served at least one year of his or her term. Although state law allows cities to hold recall elections, any particular city’s charter may either allow or forbid such an election. The wording of the city charter determines whether recall is an option.

Q:  Assuming a city’s charter allows it, how can a city official be recalled in Ohio?
A:  In Ohio, a petition must be signed by qualified voters. By law, the number of signatures required must equal at least 15 percent of the total votes cast at the most recent municipal election. In the petition, the voters demand that the city official in question be removed in favor of another official to be chosen by the voters in a recall election. This petition must be filed with the board of elections. If the board of elections finds the petition to be valid and the official in question does not resign from office within five days, then the lawmaking authority in that city may set a day for a recall election. The recall election is held 30 to 40 days after the petition is validated.

Q:  Would I be voting for one person over another in a recall election, like in a regular election?
A:  No. You actually have two separate votes. The first vote asks you to decide, with a “yes” or “no” vote, whether you wish to remove the official from office. The second vote asks you to select, from a list of qualified candidates, a successor for that official. The second vote is considered only if the first vote results in the removal of the official. The official who voters are being asked to recall may not include his or her name as one of these candidates to be considered.

Q: How would a successor candidate qualify for the ballot?
A: In a recall election, there is no primary election. Rather, a candidate who wants to replace the incumbent must file his or her intent to run for office with the board of elections at least 20 days before the special election. Each candidate must provide a petition with signatures equal to 10 percent of the total votes cast at the most recent regular municipal election. Call your local board of elections to get the exact number of signatures required.

Q: How many votes are needed to recall an official?
A: If a majority of voters decide the official should be removed, then the official will be removed. Whoever is chosen to succeed the official will then hold office for the remainder of the recalled official’s unexpired term.

Q: If the official is not recalled, can he or she be compensated for recall election expenses?
A: Yes. If the voters decide to keep the official in office after a recall election, that official is entitled to be repaid his or her actual and legitimate expenses from the city treasury, up to 50 percent of allowed campaign expenses for any regular city election.

12/2/2015

 

Loveland, Ohio – Mayor Mark Fitzgerald’s Council term does not end until December 2, 2019, however about 2,054 signatures on a recall petition were delivered today to the Hamilton County Board of

Loveland Recall History

Former Councilmember Todd Osborne said, “The last recall, the only recall, was in 1984. The city had sued HUD over Loveland Pines apartment complex. City council voted to end the lawsuit the day before the ruling, after spending $35,000. A recall petition went out and was certified by the Board of Election. The majority of Council was under recall. Ron Binegar, Roland Boike, John Munnis and John Banks. Binegar resigned but after the five day window. There was a lawsuit, which the petitioners won on appeal. Council had to establish an election date, which they refused to do for several meetings, including walking out without an adjournment. They had a special meeting at 7:25 AM to name the date. All three incumbents retained their seat.

Elections to end his term two years early. Members of the Loveland Community Heartbeat PAC (Political Action Committee) (LCHPAC) said the number of signatures is about twice the number of signatures required to get the recall initiative on the ballot this November.

In a press release issued last night, LCHPAC representative Halie Rebeccaschild said, “This has been a difficult time for Loveland residents. Walking every neighborhood in Loveland to collect signatures, we have seen firsthand not only the level of distrust and disappointment throughout the community but also the high level of awareness and engagement among Loveland residents.”

According to Sherry Poland, the Director of the Hamilton County Board of Elections, now that the petitions have been delivered, the Board will begin the process of verifying signatures. She said today that she is not yet positive of the total number of signatures that are required, but the process of determining the number will also begin. The City of Loveland is in three counties, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren, and LCHPAC will need the signatures equal to 15% of the ballots cast in all three counties at the last Loveland Council election in 2015.

Poland said that if there are sufficient signatures, Fitzgerald will be notified and given five days to either resign his office or face the recall on November 7. She added that if Fitzgerald does resign, then the recall will not be on the Ballot.

If Fitzgerald does resign, council vacancies are filled by a majority of the six remaining Council members. If Council could not agree on a replacement, then Vice-Mayor Angie Settell, who would become Mayor, could appoint Fitzgerald’s replacement unilaterally. The new Councilmember would then have to run in November to retain their seat. Currently the seats of incumbents Pam Gross, Ted Phelps, Robert Weisgerber, and Stephen Zamagias will be on the ballot this fall. Fitzgerald’s resignation may open up a fifth open seat. A successful recall petition will also open up a fifth seat, but one that would be a head-to-head race against Fitzgerald.

If Fitzgerald does not resign, his name will appear on the fall ballot next to the name of anyone who petitions the Board to run against him. Resident Neal Oury has been calling for Fitzgerald’s resignation for several months and is currently collecting signatures to run head-to-head against the Mayor.

Fitzgerald has not acknowledged or responded to emails sent to his City and personal email accounts asking for comment. Fitzgerald was asked for his reaction of the petitions being delivered and of the recall effort in general. He was also asked if he would comment on any specific allegations made against him during the PAC’s signature gathering.

Fitzgerald was also asked if he sees the possibility of legal challenges to the recall petition, or the recall being on the November ballot. He did not respond.

Oury has already gathered more than 1,500 signatures and said he will wait to see the outcome of today’s petition submission before he will bring his own to the Board of Elections.

(This story was up-dated at 6:32 AM 7-22-17)

 

See also: 

Who is running for School Board and Council?


A family-owned business offering a wide variety of soft-serve specialty desserts.



 

This is an appeal from the Loveland Athletic Boosters

  Most of you have already heard, but The Loveland Athletic Boosters would like to inform and ask our Tiger Nation to help a former Loveland athlete.
 
Joey Oberholzer is a 2012 graduate of Loveland High School who was a 4 year Varsity swimmer ending his Loveland career leading his team as captain. Joey is currently employed by Loveland Canoe and Kayak as manager, loves being outside, and active in any way he can be. Joey is known for his continual smile and willingness to pitch in and help anyone he can. He is a competitor in and out of the pool, but Joey is now in the fight of his life.  After a serious fall on July 10th, fracturing his spine and neck, he has undergone two major surgeries: one to fix his fractured neck, the second to stabilize and repair his spine. In the coming days he will be transferred to a rehabilitation center to work on the next obstacles—the largest being his attempt to walk again.

As Joey and his family look to the days, weeks, and even years ahead, they have two large expenses: the obviously expensive medical bills, modifying their home for Joey’s new mobility needs, and arranging transportation. 

Joey is a great young man and his parents, Chris and Carol Oberholzer of Loveland, have been great supporters of Loveland High School and the athletic department. The Oberholzer Family is, and will always be, a part of our Tiger family. 

As I conclude this letter, I want to ask you to surround this family and support them any way you can.  As parents, you can imagine the stresses – or can we even begin to imagine the stress of this situation?  Chris and Carol have been a great team, taking shifts at the hospital, continuing to run their business, and continue to be parents to their other children.  If you are able and willing to provide financial assistance, please follow the link below.
 
It is remarkable that Joey survived the fall and subsequent surgeries.  Tiger family, we are LOVELAND STRONG and this community has overcome many hurts, devastations  and crisis…… let’s surround Joey and his family and make this nightmare just a little more manageable, a little more bearable and surround them in every way possible.  Your financial support as well as your fervent prayers are so appreciated.
 
Please help Joey by making a difference and helping him overcome this battle by going to:
https://www.gofundme.com/joey-oberholzers-medical-fund
 
Jeff Williams
President of Loveland Athletic Boosters

 
   

EDITOR’S NOTE: Please excuse the quality of our recent video work from the Loveland City Hall council chamber. After the City recently hired a Public Information Officer (PIO), LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV, USA-Today videographers, and Cincinnati Area TV stations have been put into a small corral to one side of the room, and the podium was placed so that when the public rises to speak, they have their backs toward the audience and our camera. We have talked to the PIO, City Manager and the Clerk of Council about how this arrangement significantly degrades our video, “The old set-up allowed a video camera to swing back and forth between those at the podium and the council table. That arrangement had been used for decades.”

Our plea has fallen on deaf ears. The PIO, however, did respond saying, “Unfortunately, the arrangement of the media area will not be moved to accommodate better angles at this time.”

So, for the time being, LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV is forced to show butts instead of faces, except when Councilwoman Pam Gross uses the podium. (See this recent video)

Loveland, Ohio – Resident Tom Morris spoke at the June 13 Council meeting expressed concerns about the development of 50 or more condos on Butterworth Road which would add to traffic congestion on State Route 48 and West Loveland Avenue, and the need to improve the City’s infrastructure.

“We don’t have the roads for these kinds of projects. We don’t have the structure to get through the City. We need to be having more discussion before we go gung-ho with more condos, more properties, more apartments, more shopping places,” Morris said.

Morris asked if City Hall was sacrificing Loveland’s quality of life for people who may only live here three months to a year in an apartment at the expense of people who have lived here for sixty years in a home.

Morris said, “It’s terrible to see Historic Loveland falling apart literally and figuratively more each day.” He asked Council to involve the community in decisions affecting the future of Loveland.



Rick Ogden Heating & Air Conditioning

Installation and maintenance of heating and cooling systems in Loveland, Ohio Rick Ogden Heating & Air Conditioning is a family owned company.


 

It will take action by each of us to lower the risk to our children

 

Loveland, Ohio – The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency has issued an Air Quality Advisory for Thursday, July 19 for Loveland. and the surrounding counties of Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren in Ohio, and Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties in Kentucky. 

 

The Agency expects to see levels of ozone in the “unhealthy for sensitive groups” range on the Air Quality Index (AQI). 

 

Health Message: Active children and adults, and people with lung disease, such as asthma, should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.

 

On Air Quality Advisory days, everyone can help reduce ozone formation by taking the following actions:

  • Bike, or walk instead of drive.
  • Refuel your vehicle after 8 p.m.; do not top off when refueling and tighten the gas cap.
  • DON’T RIDE YOUR MOTORCYCLE
  • Do not idle your vehicle; exhaust contributes considerably to ozone formation.
  • Combine trips or eliminating unnecessary vehicle trips.
  • Avoid use of gasoline-powered lawn equipment on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Avoid use of oil-based paints and stains on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Never burn leaves or other yard trimmings.
  • Suspend use of fire pits, campfires and grills on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Conserve electricity by turning out lights and unplugging unused appliances and electronics.


Children face special risks from air pollution because their lungs are growing and because they are so active Air-pollution-health-dangers

Just like the arms and legs, the largest portion of a child’s lungs will grow long after he or she is born. Eighty percent of their tiny air sacs develop after birth. Those sacs, called the alveoli, are where the life-sustaining transfer of oxygen to the blood takes place. The lungs and their alveoli aren’t fully grown until children become adults.1 In addition, the body’s defenses that help adults fight off infections are still developing in young bodies.2 Children have more respiratory infections than adults, which also seems to increase their susceptibility to air pollution.

Furthermore, children don’t behave like adults, and their behavior also affects their vulnerability. They are outside for longer periods and are usually more active when outdoors. Consequently, they inhale more polluted outdoor air than adults typically do.

Air Pollution Increases Risk of Underdeveloped Lungs

A Southern California Children’s Health study looked at the long-term effects of particle pollution on teenagers. Tracking 1,759 children who were between ages 10 and 18 from 1993 to 2001, researchers found that those who grew up in more polluted areas face the increased risk of having underdeveloped lungs, which may never recover to their full capacity. The average drop in lung function was 20 percent below what was expected for the child’s age, similar to the impact of growing up in a home with parents who smoked.

Community health studies are pointing to less obvious, but serious effects from year-round exposure to ozone, especially for children. Scientists followed 500 Yale University students and determined that living just four years in a region with high levels of ozone and related co-pollutants was associated with diminished lung function and frequent reports of respiratory symptoms. 6 A much larger study of 3,300 school children in Southern California found reduced lung function in girls with asthma and boys who spent more time outdoors in areas with high levels of ozone.

 

Read more from the American Lung Association

For 17 years, the American Lung Association has analyzed data from official air quality monitors to compile the State of the Air report. The more you learn about the air you breathe, the more you can protect your health and take steps to make our air cleaner and healthier.

In American Lung Association’s, Report Card: Ohio, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren counties all receive an “F”
Cincinnati Air Quality a Mixed Bag, Finds 2016 ‘State of the Air’ Report

 

Step up to Curb Pollution in Our Community.

  • Drive less. Combine trips, walk, bike, carpool or vanpool, and use buses, subways or other alternatives to driving. Vehicle emissions are a major source of air pollution. Support community plans that provide ways to get around that don’t require a car, such as more sidewalks, bike trails and transit systems.
  • Use less electricity.Turn out the lights and use energy-efficient appliances. Generating electricity is one of the biggest sources of pollution, particularly in the eastern United States.
  • Don’t burn wood or trash. Burning firewood and trash is among the largest sources of particle pollution in many parts of the country. If you must use a fireplace or stove for heat, convert your woodstove to natural gas, which has far fewer polluting emissions. Compost and recycle as much as possible and dispose of other waste properly; don’t burn it. Support efforts in your community to ban outdoor burning of construction and yard wastes. Avoid the use of outdoor hydronic heaters, also called outdoor wood boilers, which are frequently much more polluting than woodstoves.
  • Make sure your local school system requires clean school buses, which includes replacing or retrofitting old school buses with filters and other equipment to reduce emissions. Make sure your local schools don’t idle their buses, a step that can immediately reduce emissions.

 



Now Enrolling at All About Kids at Wards Corner today!



 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Please excuse the quality of our recent video work from the Loveland City Hall council chamber. After the City recently hired a Public Information Officer (PIO), LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV, USA-Today videographers, and Cincinnati Area TV stations have been put into a small corral to one side of the room, and the podium was placed so that when the public rises to speak, they have their backs toward the audience and our camera. We have talked to the PIO, City Manager and the Clerk of Council about how this arrangement significantly degrades our video, “The old set-up allowed a video camera to swing back and forth between those at the podium and the council table. That arrangement had been used for decades.”

Our plea has fallen on deaf ears. The PIO, however, did respond saying, “Unfortunately, the arrangement of the media area will not be moved to accommodate better angles at this time.”

So, for the time being, LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV is forced to show butts instead of faces, except when Councilwoman Pam Gross uses the podium. (See this recent video)

Loveland, Ohio -At the June 13 Council meeting, Sherry Hamlin spoke at Open Forum. She said that at the May 9 City Council meeting, Councilman Weisgerber moved to terminate Rob Stansel’s contract for economic development services because the contract violated the spending limits Council has authorized to the City Manager. The motion passed.

Hamlin noted that the May 23 agenda published on the City’s website included a resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter a new agreement between the City of Loveland and Rob Stansel. She said she was attending the meeting because she was interested in Rob Stansel’s contract, but when she got there it was no longer on the agenda. During the open forum, she asked, “Where did it go and why was it eliminated.”

Hamlin’s allegation is that agenda was later amended to eliminate the resolution, which would violate a Loveland ordinance and quoted a section of the code which says that any change to the agenda as it appears in “Council’s Packet” shall require the consent of a majority of Council at the meeting. Hamlin said that once an agenda item is made public it must be discussed in public unless a majority of Council votes to amend their agenda at the beginning of the meeting. “The fact that it was not, sends a message that somehow, somewhere, someone, discussed this topic outside of the public eye and an agreement was made to remove it from the agenda.” She said having an item appear and disappear is a direct violation of a Loveland Ordinance,

Hamlin’ said this was another signal that back door discussions were happening at City Hall. She said, “Residents who have spoken at open forum have made it clear that they crave transparency. And I just ask. When will our request be honored?”

 



Thank you Jarvis Global Investments for supporting our student journalists



 

Columbus, Ohio – Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today the application process is now open for Ohio law enforcement teams to apply for $3 million in new state grant money that will replicate or expand Drug Abuse Response Teams (DARTs) and Quick Response Teams (QRTs) to address the opioid epidemic in Ohio. 

The Ohio Attorney General’s Office will distribute the $3 million over FY 2018 and 2019, as designed by a budget amendment sponsored by Senator Randy Gardner (R-Bowling Green) and signed into law last month. The grants will be awarded to local law enforcement agencies and must include a partnership with a treatment provider.  Preference will be given to applicants that include other partners such as a mental health recovery board, peer specialists, fire department, emergency management system agency, faith-based organizations, children’s services organizations or other appropriate agencies.

“The goal of Drug Abuse Response Teams and Quick Response Teams is to save lives by getting those addicted to opioids into treatment and leading them to resources so they can stay clean,” said Attorney General DeWine. “The teams established now have a collaborative partnership in their community to address addiction and help Ohio families.  That’s what we will see more of with this grant money, and it’s something Ohio desperately needs.”

Specifically, the grant funding will support efforts similar to the QRTs in Colerain Township (Hamilton County) and Summit County, as well as the DART in Lucas County. 

Lucas County DART provides 24-hour assistance to overdose survivors and their families.  Since 2014, DART has assisted nearly 2,300 opioid survivors and has had a 74 percent success rate in getting survivors into detox and linked to treatment programs.

Colerain Township in Hamilton County estimates that their Quick Response Team has conducted 250 investigations with nearly 80 percent of the overdose survivors they have encountered entering treatment. Summit County’s QRTs are based on the Colerain Township model and are now operating in Cuyahoga Falls, Green, Barberton, Norton, Tallmadge, Stow, Munroe Falls, Akron, Coventry, and Hudson.

The application process for this law enforcement grant program can be found on the Ohio Attorney General’s website at www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov/LawEnforcementGrants. The application deadline is 5pm EST on Friday, August 18, 2017.   For technical assistance with any requirements, contact HeroinUnit@OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov.    

Grant recipients will be notified on Thursday, August 31, 2017. 



New offerings for your child at VisionArts studio in Loveland

Help your child improve their academic performance this school year by enrolling them in the creative arts program at VisionArts studio in Loveland!


 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Please excuse the quality of our recent video work from the Loveland City Hall council chamber. After the City recently hired a Public Information Officer (PIO), LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV, USA-Today videographers, and Cincinnati Area TV stations have been put into a small corral to one side of the room, and the podium was placed so that when the public rises to speak, they have their backs toward the audience and our camera. We have talked to the PIO, City Manager and the Clerk of Council about how this arrangement significantly degrades our video, “The old set-up allowed a video camera to swing back and forth between those at the podium and the council table. That arrangement had been used for decades.”

Our plea has fallen on deaf ears. The PIO, however, did respond saying, “Unfortunately, the arrangement of the media area will not be moved to accommodate better angles at this time.”

So, for the time being, LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV is forced to show butts instead of faces, except when Councilwoman Pam Gross uses the podium. (See this recent video)

Its like talking to the wall

Loveland, Ohio – At the June 13 Council meeting, Dick Dyson spoke at Open Forum. He said that at the previous Council meeting, he asked if it was appropriate for a City Council member to sit on the Planning and Zoning Commission and also serve as the Vice President of the Community Improvement Corporation. He to date has received no answer, so he was asking the question again. He said, “Its like talking to the wall,” he said.

He said that Councilwoman Pam Gross has considerable influence and far more influence than should be allowed. Mr. Dyson wanted to know how he could get an answer to his question.



Now Enrolling at All About Kids at Wards Corner today!



 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Please excuse the quality of our recent video work from the Loveland City Hall council chamber. After the City recently hired a Public Information Officer (PIO), LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV, USA-Today videographers, and Cincinnati Area TV stations have been put into a small corral to one side of the room, and the podium was placed so that when the public rises to speak, they have their backs toward the audience and our camera. We have talked to the PIO, City Manager and the Clerk of Council about how this arrangement significantly degrades our video, “The old set-up allowed a video camera to swing back and forth between those at the podium and the council table. That arrangement had been used for decades.”

Our plea has fallen on deaf ears. The PIO, however, did respond saying, “Unfortunately, the arrangement of the media area will not be moved to accommodate better angles at this time.”

So, for the time being, LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV is forced to show butts instead of faces, except when Councilwoman Pam Gross uses the podium. (See this recent video)

 

Loveland, Ohio – At the June 13 Council meeting, Mary Ann Lynn spoke at Open Forum. She referenced an editorial written by Councilwoman Gross that was published in the Loveland Herald. She noted that Gross went on record in a public forum to share her thoughts and positions. Lynn encouraged every Council Member to follow suit and state their position on the demolition and re-purposing of City Hall.

Lynn cited the Loveland Station development as proof that the City does not have the standards in place to ensure the quality historic integrity and eye-appeal of new construction in Historic Loveland, whereas Gross referred to Loveland Station as the new heart to old Loveland and assured residents that specific guidelines were in place to guide that project, suggesting the City has all the standards needed for historic Loveland.

 Lynn said that Gross displayed her capacity for deception by misrepresenting herself as a champion for resident input on the City Hall project, and misrepresented the efforts of a fellow Council Member to schedule informal meetings on the project.

Lynn said that a formal public hearing is not the first step in gathering information; it was the last box to be checked before Council could vote to transfer property to the Community Improvement Corporation. Lynn noted that. Gross voted against the informal sessions and that there was a growing concern in the community about a lack of honesty and transparency, and there were concerns that secret plans and backroom deals are being made. She said that key committees have been whittled down to include only the Mayor’s hand-picked representatives with meeting logistics that discourage inclusion.

Lynn said that the best way to calm the community is to bring the business of the City out in the open.



Auctions Around Town – Local online estate sales and consignments

It’s high season for deals We are an online estate sale and consignment company Recycle. Repurposing. Reuse Whatever you choose to call it,


 

It will take action by each of us to lower the risk to our children

Loveland, Ohio – The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency has issued an Air Quality Advisory for Wednesday, July 19 for Loveland. and the surrounding counties of Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren in Ohio, and Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties in Kentucky. 

 

The Agency expects to see levels of ozone in the “unhealthy for sensitive groups” range on the Air Quality Index (AQI). 

 

Health Message: Active children and adults, and people with lung disease, such as asthma, should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.

 

On Air Quality Advisory days, everyone can help reduce ozone formation by taking the following actions:

  • Bike, or walk instead of drive.
  • Refuel your vehicle after 8 p.m.; do not top off when refueling and tighten the gas cap.
  • DON’T RIDE YOUR MOTORCYCLE
  • Do not idle your vehicle; exhaust contributes considerably to ozone formation.
  • Combine trips or eliminating unnecessary vehicle trips.
  • Avoid use of gasoline-powered lawn equipment on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Avoid use of oil-based paints and stains on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Never burn leaves or other yard trimmings.
  • Suspend use of fire pits, campfires and grills on Air Quality Advisory days.
  • Conserve electricity by turning out lights and unplugging unused appliances and electronics.


Children face special risks from air pollution because their lungs are growing and because they are so active Air-pollution-health-dangers

Just like the arms and legs, the largest portion of a child’s lungs will grow long after he or she is born. Eighty percent of their tiny air sacs develop after birth. Those sacs, called the alveoli, are where the life-sustaining transfer of oxygen to the blood takes place. The lungs and their alveoli aren’t fully grown until children become adults.1 In addition, the body’s defenses that help adults fight off infections are still developing in young bodies.2 Children have more respiratory infections than adults, which also seems to increase their susceptibility to air pollution.

Furthermore, children don’t behave like adults, and their behavior also affects their vulnerability. They are outside for longer periods and are usually more active when outdoors. Consequently, they inhale more polluted outdoor air than adults typically do.

Air Pollution Increases Risk of Underdeveloped Lungs

A Southern California Children’s Health study looked at the long-term effects of particle pollution on teenagers. Tracking 1,759 children who were between ages 10 and 18 from 1993 to 2001, researchers found that those who grew up in more polluted areas face the increased risk of having underdeveloped lungs, which may never recover to their full capacity. The average drop in lung function was 20 percent below what was expected for the child’s age, similar to the impact of growing up in a home with parents who smoked.

Community health studies are pointing to less obvious, but serious effects from year-round exposure to ozone, especially for children. Scientists followed 500 Yale University students and determined that living just four years in a region with high levels of ozone and related co-pollutants was associated with diminished lung function and frequent reports of respiratory symptoms. 6 A much larger study of 3,300 school children in Southern California found reduced lung function in girls with asthma and boys who spent more time outdoors in areas with high levels of ozone.

 

Read more from the American Lung Association

For 17 years, the American Lung Association has analyzed data from official air quality monitors to compile the State of the Air report. The more you learn about the air you breathe, the more you can protect your health and take steps to make our air cleaner and healthier.

In American Lung Association’s, Report Card: Ohio, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren counties all receive an “F”
Cincinnati Air Quality a Mixed Bag, Finds 2016 ‘State of the Air’ Report

 

Step up to Curb Pollution in Our Community.

  • Drive less. Combine trips, walk, bike, carpool or vanpool, and use buses, subways or other alternatives to driving. Vehicle emissions are a major source of air pollution. Support community plans that provide ways to get around that don’t require a car, such as more sidewalks, bike trails and transit systems.
  • Use less electricity.Turn out the lights and use energy-efficient appliances. Generating electricity is one of the biggest sources of pollution, particularly in the eastern United States.
  • Don’t burn wood or trash. Burning firewood and trash is among the largest sources of particle pollution in many parts of the country. If you must use a fireplace or stove for heat, convert your woodstove to natural gas, which has far fewer polluting emissions. Compost and recycle as much as possible and dispose of other waste properly; don’t burn it. Support efforts in your community to ban outdoor burning of construction and yard wastes. Avoid the use of outdoor hydronic heaters, also called outdoor wood boilers, which are frequently much more polluting than woodstoves.
  • Make sure your local school system requires clean school buses, which includes replacing or retrofitting old school buses with filters and other equipment to reduce emissions. Make sure your local schools don’t idle their buses, a step that can immediately reduce emissions.

 



Now Enrolling at All About Kids at Wards Corner today!



 

%d bloggers like this: